To each according to his ability to each according to his need..

Prologue

To my (imaginary) readers:

I’m afraid with finals rolling up, this post will probably be a bit shorter than I’d like.  Although as you can see, I did reward all of you with a precious feminist cartoon about the division of household responsibilities.  And also, a Karl Marx quote, whose relevance to the topic you may still be trying to comprehend.  The quote is actually a little joke on the totally *uneven* division of household responsibility I’ve witnessed in my parents’ house whilst growing up as well as in countless others’ homes; apparently, while women have done relatively well catching up to men in the workplace, we are to assume men simply don’t have the *ability* to do their fair share of household work and childcare.  In fact, I think I’ve actually heard that argument made by some social conservatives.

Blog entry 

Bullsh*t.  (At least, to that whole conservative argument I mentioned in the prologue).  Even if men can’t exactly give birth or breastfeed, that does not make them useless as caretakers, nor is there an anatomical barrier that prevents men today from cooking or washing the dishes.  Sadly though, I am not the only who grew up watching my full-time working mother do nearly all the household chores; as the American Time Use Survey reveals, women are still doing a bigger share of household chores, child rearing, and are also consequently getting less leisure time.  To be fair, many women do work part-time, although one has to wonder how many do so because they feel social pressure to put the household work first.  My issue is not necessarily with those families where women work less in exchange for spending more time taking care of the house, but situations where women do BOTH all housework AND work full-time.  I’ve seen almost every couple in my family maintain this kind of arrangement, and I have to say that it breeds a great deal of resentment.  Although schedules and talents do not always permit for a perfectly egalitarian division of responsibility, I think both men and women need to focus more on sharing work in the house and, in some cases, permitting the other person to infiltrate their “sphere” of work.  Perhaps if there was not such a stigma on husbands staying at home to take care of children or a tendency to hold only the wife/mother accountable for domestic difficulties, woman today wouldn’t struggling under the weight of their new feminist role while men are left feeling weak and useless with only that ‘half a bag’ we see in the cartoon.  We feminists may have said we wanted it all, but we didn’t mean it that way.

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “To each according to his ability to each according to his need..

  1. First, the Marxist slogan is “From each according to his ability, to each according to his need.”

    Second, men are not paid more for the same work. Women are paid slightly more. (WHAT that’s bullshit everyone knows that blah blah blah…) Here’s the problem with the studies that “show” men are paid more: they don’t bother to do any critical thinking.

    Feminist hand-wringing about the wage gap relies on the assumption that the differences in average earnings stem from discrimination. Thus the mantra that women make only 77% of what men earn for equal work. But even a cursory review of the data proves this assumption false.

    The Department of Labor’s Time Use survey shows that full-time working women spend an average of 8.01 hours per day on the job, compared to 8.75 hours for full-time working men. One would expect that someone who works 9% more would also earn more. This one fact alone accounts for more than a third of the wage gap.

    Choice of occupation also plays an important role in earnings. … Women gravitate toward jobs with fewer risks, more comfortable conditions, regular hours, more personal fulfillment and greater flexibility. …

    Recent studies have shown that the wage gap shrinks—or even reverses—when relevant factors are taken into account and comparisons are made between men and women in similar circumstances. In a 2010 study of single, childless urban workers between the ages of 22 and 30, the research firm Reach Advisors found that women earned an average of 8% more than their male counterparts.

    • Spam? The article wasn’t about paid work, just domestic. Regardless, I’ve read that article and can respect the research…. even if the author that cites revolts me to no end.

      Cheers Mr. Spammer.

  2. I’m guessing you’ve never seen actual spam comments. (They usually involve Viagra.)

    I don’t know where you’re getting this “wasn’t about paid work, just domestic” nonsense, but it’s not anywhere in the article I linked.

    “I’ve read that article and can respect the research…” So I assume you’ll be retracting your post?

  3. Oh, I see. You meant your article. From your approvingly cited cartoon: “This is unfair… we’re both working, but your work gets high pay and status.”

    The rest of your post was about how “women are still doing a bigger share of household chores.” Makes sense, given that “[w]omen gravitate toward jobs with fewer risks, more comfortable conditions, regular hours, more personal fulfillment and greater flexibility” (from the WSJ article), i.e. “women work less in exchange for spending more time taking care of the house” (you).

  4. The University of Minnesota Women’s Center wishes to foster a lively, civil debate through the use of blog comments. All comments are welcome as long as they do not contain racist, sexist, homophobic, or otherwise overtly objectionable content. Differences of opinion are welcome; comments will not be deleted on a difference of opinion alone. Threats, trolling, pointless belligerence, and hate speech are not welcome. Breaking of these rules could result in deleted comments or being banned from posting comments. The Director and Assistant Director of the University of Minnesota Women’s Center have the final say as to whether comments are appropriate or not. (Refer to our comments policy)

    Unamused – due to your infringement of our comments policy, your comments will be deleted ““women work less in exchange for spending more time taking care of the house” (you).” This is blatantly sexist, offensive and not a civil debate; it also qualifies as hostile belligerence. Please continue to post your content on your blog, but it is no longer acceptable here unless you decide to engage in polite, respectful discussion using reliable sources and defend your opinion on the issues being discussed and not the blogger. Thank you.

  5. It’s a direct quote from you.

    “My issue is not necessarily with those families where women work less in exchange for spending more time taking care of the house, but situations where women do BOTH all housework AND work full-time.”

    The parenthetical “you” is a citation, just like the previous parenthetical remark — “from the WSJ article” — is a citation.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s